Team

Efterpi Mitsi is Professor in English Literature and Culture at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Her research and publications focus on classical receptions in English literature, word and image relations, and on travellers to Greece. She is the author of Greece in Early English Travel Writing, 1596-1682, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017), editor of Troilus and Cressida: A Critical Reader (Bloomsbury, 2019), and co-editor of Ruins in the Literary and Cultural Imagination (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), The Letter of the Law: Literature, Justice and the Other (Peter Lang, 2013), Women Writing Greece: Essays on Hellenism, Orientalism and Travel (Rodopi 2008), In the Country of the Moon, British Women Travellers to Greece 1718-1932 (Hestia 2005), etc. She is the recipient of a Hellenic Foundation for Research & Innovation grant for the research project  “Representations of Modern Greece in Victorian Popular Culture” (2020-2023) and a member of the project “Hotels and the Modern Subject: 1890-1940” also funded by HFRI.

 

Anna Despotopoulou is Professor in English Literature and Culture at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, and she is currently the Director of the Department of English post-graduate programme in English literature. She is the author of Women and the Railway, 1850-1915 (Edinburgh UP, 2015), and she has published articles on Henry James, George Eliot, Jane Austen, Christina Rossetti, Rhoda Broughton, Joseph Conrad, Peter Shaffer, and Flora Annie Steel. She has co-edited Henry James and the Supernatural (with Kimberly Reed; Palgrave-Macmillan, 2011), Ruins in the Literary and Cultural Imagination (with Efterpi Mitsi, Stamatina Dimakopoulou, Emmanouil Aretoulakis; Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), Transforming Henry James (with Donatella Izzo and Anna De Biasio; Cambridge Scholars, 2013). She is now writing a book on Henry James, women, and mobility to be published by Edinburgh University Press. She is the recipient of a Hellenic Foundation for Research & Innovation grant for a research project entitled “Hotels and the Modern Subject: 1890-1940”  (2020-2023) and a member of the project “Representations of Modern Greece in Victorian Popular Culture” also funded by HFRI.

 

Tatiana Kontou is Senior Lecturer in Nineteenth-Century Literature at Oxford Brookes University, UK. She is the author of Spiritualism and Women’s Writing: from the fin de siècle to the Neo-Victorian (Palgrave, 2009), editor of Women and the Victorian Occult (Routledge, 2010) and co-editor with Sarah Willburn of The Ashgate Research Companion to Nineteenth-Century Spiritualism and the Occult (Ashgate, 2012). She has published book chapters and articles on Wilkie Collins, sensation fiction and spiritualism, psychical research and fin de siècle occult detectives, Florence Marryat and the short story. She is co-editing with Vicky Mills a six-volume collection of primary sources on Victorian Material Culture (forthcoming by Routledge). Tatiana is a member of the research team on “Representations of Modern Greece in Victorian Popular Culture” funded by the HFRI.

 

Konstantina Georganta is a postdoctoral researcher in the project “Representations of Modern Greece in Victorian Popular Culture” funded by the Hellenic Foundation for Research & Innovation. She holds a PhD and a MPhil in English Literature from the University of Glasgow and a BA from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is the author of Conversing Identities: Encounters Between British, Irish and Greek Poetry, 1922-1952 (Brill, 2012) and Three Long Poems in Athens: Erēmē Gē-Perama-Kleftiko. Translations and Essays (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2018), editor of Athens in Poems: An Imaginative Map of Athens (The Colleagues’ Publications, 2019) and co-editor with Anne-Marie Millim and Fabienne Collignon of The Apothecary’s Chest: Magic, Art and Medication (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2009). Her research interests include British and Irish Modernism, Modernism & Hellenism, Modern and Contemporary Poetry and Literature, Diaspora and Migrant Narratives, Urban Poetics, Political Satire, Translation. She manages athensinapoem.com, a website dedicated to the collection of material on urban poetics about Athens, and akindofclock.com, where one may find a world of Greek poetry into English.

 

Chryssa Marinou holds a PhD from the Department of English Language and Literature, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Henry James, Dorothy Richardson, Walter Benjamin: Turn-of-the-Century Writing and the Benjaminian Archiving of the Modern). She is currently working as post-doctoral research for two research projects funded by HFRI. She has published in Synthesis: an Anglophone Journal of Comparative Literary Studies (2013 and 2018), Pilgrimages: a Journal of Dorothy Richardson Studies (2015), and Mnimon: Society for the Study of Modern Hellenism (2016). She has contributed to Arcades Material Yellow: Subterranean to Street (Aldgate Press, 2019), ed. Sam Dolbear and Hannah Proctor, and Ruins in the Literary and Cultural Imagination (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), ed. E. Mitsi et al. Her research interests include comparative literature, modernity, modernism, literary theory.

 

Mathilde Pyrli holds a BA in English Language and Literature (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens /NKUA) and an MA in Histories and Cultures/Cultural Memory (University of Brighton). She is currently a PhD student at NKUA (Department of English Language and Literature), examining the representations of modern Greece, both textual and visual, in the Victorian popular print media and specifically in magazines and reviews, newspapers and stereoscopic photographs. She works as an archivist at the Photographic Archive of the Hellenic Literary and Historical Archive/Cultural Foundation of the National Bank of Greece (ELIA/MIET) and is also responsible for the Map Collection (19th-20th centuries) as well as for the Department of Hellenism of Egypt (1828-1958). She co-edits, with Vassiliki Hatzigeorgiou, MIET’s photographic series AFELIA (MIET, 2016-2020, volumes 1-8). Her research interests include 19th century travel literature, the popular press, and photography.